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Author Topic: Writing Invocations and Evocations?  (Read 309 times)

Offline Salqu

  • Beginner
  • Country: nz
Writing Invocations and Evocations?
« on: August 11, 2017, 07:49:41 pm »
I have been searching around a bit, read the prayer book, etc, looking for specific prayers to call a specific Netjer before time at the Shrine... I found some good ones but some of the Netjeru seem to have a lot of missing information. I am guided lately to write my own. I believe that means something more to them, to use the power in my own words, a gift given to us all by Netjer, to call them.

I was wondering if there is any specific structure and how that structures differs between an Invocation and an Evocation? (pretty sure I know the difference, the former is calling on their focus towards you while the other is calling on them to actually focus their presence towards you correct?)

I feel when the time comes to sit down and write... I will be guided to write what is best, assuming I have a loose structure and guideline to start with.

I realize this may not be a K/O thing, but I am willing to bet someone here has the information.

Offline Gezausenu

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Writing Invocations and Evocations?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2017, 08:10:03 pm »
Em hotep, friend!

Well, I don't believe we really have invocations or evocations per se--at least as I understand them--unless something along those lines exists for Saq. We do have hymns and prayers, though, and in my experience, the Gods respond just fine to those. ;)

If you're feeling an urge to write your own prayers . . . do it! See what happens, what comes out. Remember, writing a hymn is heka and a prayer itself: it's an act of creation on your part as an offering to a Name even before you actually offer it as sound from your lips.

I like writing hymns, and prayers, and often the lines are blurred between the two. From my experience, write. Let Them, the Gods, guide you. Are you familiar at all with free-association writing? Try to turn off your brain. Don't get hung up on making it sound "pretty" or "right". Listen.

Then, when you've written it down, offer it in shrine. Speak it, sing it, shout it. That--the effort of creation, the speaking, the singing--that is what, in my experience, draws the Gods to you more than anything. The efforts of your heart.

Senebty,
Gezausenu.
~Favored of Two~ (Please don't call me Gezau for short; thank you!)
Meset Set her Sekhmet
Meryt Ptah, Djehuty, her Heru-Wer
"Let your bending in the Archer's hand be for gladness." - Kahlil Gibran
they / them / their / themself

Offline BluePiaski

  • Remetj
  • Country: us
Re: Writing Invocations and Evocations?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2017, 09:38:25 pm »
An invocation calls a netjer's power into you; an evocation calls that power into something else. Evocations honestly aren't used that often. An invocation can be used if you practice theurgy or in ritual (I use these often). They look fairly similar in their structure.
There's actually no real structure, but you can look around the internet or books for ideas on how to start. But I think it's always best to write your own. Call Them, flatter Them, describe Them, and let it be what feels right and real to you. (That's pretty much how I do them; maybe talk about Their myths and specialties, use epithets.) Trust Them.
I hope I've explained my personal uses and experience understandably. Good luck!
Senebty.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk


Offline Sedjfaiemitui

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Writing Invocations and Evocations?
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2017, 04:30:03 am »
I have been searching around a bit, read the prayer book, etc, looking for specific prayers to call a specific Netjer before time at the Shrine... I found some good ones but some of the Netjeru seem to have a lot of missing information. I am guided lately to write my own. I believe that means something more to them, to use the power in my own words, a gift given to us all by Netjer, to call them.

I was wondering if there is any specific structure and how that structures differs between an Invocation and an Evocation? (pretty sure I know the difference, the former is calling on their focus towards you while the other is calling on them to actually focus their presence towards you correct?)

I feel when the time comes to sit down and write... I will be guided to write what is best, assuming I have a loose structure and guideline to start with.

I realize this may not be a K/O thing, but I am willing to bet someone here has the information.

Em hotep nefer, Salqu! :D

It may help you to look at some historical Invocation Hymns. On my personal blog, I transcribed a few of the hymns to Amun-Re from Hypostyle M of Hebet/Hibis Temple in the Kharga Oasis, as given by David Klotz in his text Adoration of the Ram. The full text is available from the author to read on academia.edu. It's absolutely worth reading from cover to cover, but if you just want to look at the hymns with no real exposition, the transcribing I did ought to serve your immediate purposes.

As you likely know already, all hymns don't take the same form for every Netjer. That said, there is a particular structure to them. Some notable commonalities include, but are not limited to: cult topographies; general descriptions of either/both the schemes of the Solar and Lunar Mysteries; roles in the Duat; orientation or and temporary, non-universal "subordination," aka "constellationization," of other Netjeru to the Netjer being chiefly addressed; orientation of other major local theologies to the one exemplified in the given hymn . . . The Hebet hymns demonstrate all these features and more, which makes them good items for instruction even if one isn't particularly interested in worshiping Amun-Re the Hebetite way.

Hymns also don't have to be long. They can be, and often are, but don't feel you need to go on and on for pages and pages to make a good hymn. Even at Hebet, there is a "Liturgical Hymn" that is essentially a redacted form of the "Creator Hymn." The latter is quite lengthy, and in my own personal service to Amun-Re-Banebdjedet I have patched together, takes me more than 20 minutes to properly perform. I didn't include the "Liturgical Hymn" in the items I transcribed, but it is included in Klotz's text if you want to examine that yourself.

As for "evocation," in strict terms, that is a Roman practice of "calling the God out of His city," a religious process that accompanies the military process of subduing an enemy city: evocatio , the transference of local Divine favor from an opposing people to the Roman military and the Senate. Ancient Mesopotamian peoples, particularly Neo-Assyrians, had developed similar practices many centuries earlier. Outside this specific, original context, "evocation" refers to "summoning," which is not the same thing as invoking a deity, which is a respectful awakening and greeting of a deity.

As a general rule within Egyptian religion(s), invocations are part and parcel of the formal cult of a deity, and evocations are sometimes encountered in spells.

I hope this helps!

Senebty!
Sedjfai
"Endowed by Two Fathers"
Sat Set her Amun-Re-Banebdjedet
Meryt Wesir-Herishef, Heru-Wer, her Yinepu
𓃫𓃞 𓀱𓁡 𓅄 𓃤

Offline Gezausenu

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Writing Invocations and Evocations?
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2017, 07:13:48 am »
As a general rule within Egyptian religion(s), invocations are part and parcel of the formal cult of a deity, and evocations are sometimes encountered in spells.

Hm! I did not know this.

Thanks for bringing in the historical stuff, Sedjfai! I'm a big fan of UPG but it's fascinating to hear this side of things, too. ^_^ I guess I just paused because I don't really recall having ever stumbled across the concept of someone invoking or evoking Anyone, not on the HoN forums, anyway. Or, at least, not using those words.

Thanks for the lesson, friend! I stand corrected! :P

Senebty,
Gezausenu.
~Favored of Two~ (Please don't call me Gezau for short; thank you!)
Meset Set her Sekhmet
Meryt Ptah, Djehuty, her Heru-Wer
"Let your bending in the Archer's hand be for gladness." - Kahlil Gibran
they / them / their / themself

 


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