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Author Topic: Leadership in the Common Era  (Read 66446 times)

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Leadership in the Common Era
« on: December 22, 2009, 10:24:50 am »
This topic/question relates to leadership in the common era, specifically, the Nisut. I haven't been able to find much information on this, and I've heard conflicting answers as to why there is a Nisut, the necessity of a Nisut, and what role said Nisut plays in modern Kemetic practice.
So, in your opinion, how important is a Nisut in your Kemetic practices? And why?

And sorry if this has been asked before, I couldn't find anything on it.

-Devo
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Offline Sedjemes

  • Semer-Wati
  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2009, 10:42:56 am »
Hotep Devo

I can only answer as a Kemetic Orthodox. I came to the House of Netjer, with as full of an understanding as I could have, after completing the beginners/prospective members/interested people course offered here, and after reading a lot of scholarly texts on egyptian religion and history.

Not every Kemetic may think a Nisut is important. That is fine. Here, the Nisut is our spiritual teacher, our leader, and our King. She does not set down "commandments" or "rules" for us or even tells us how or when we should pray and how our lives should be before we can even pray;  but in matters of state ritual She is the Chief and Only Priest.

Hope this helps :)

Senebty
Sedjemes
Khenmetaset ("Aset Gladdens")
Sedjemes ("She listens")
Daughter of Aset-Serqet, Meryt Ra her Sekhmet
Heri-Sesheta Aset-Serqet

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2009, 10:49:38 am »
How does her leadership affect you personally, though? Really, through your description, she sounds more of an HPS than a Pharaoh/King type thing. Am I to understand this correctly?
-Devo
dA | FB | Tumblr | WP

Offline Sedjemes

  • Semer-Wati
  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2009, 11:15:56 am »
Affect me personally? In many ways relating my faith practice. The words and actions I say and perform in my formal shrine rite, the state rituals in which I participate and assist, the beginners lessons that I and other priests teach--all have been written by the Nisut (translated by her from ancient texts). I and all the priests perform state rituals as Her designates, while SHe performs even more than do we and more frequently. She leads all weekly rituals and teaching chats for the membership. She is the bridge between gods and men. That is what I believe and why I am here.



« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 pm by Sedjemes »
Khenmetaset ("Aset Gladdens")
Sedjemes ("She listens")
Daughter of Aset-Serqet, Meryt Ra her Sekhmet
Heri-Sesheta Aset-Serqet

Offline Maainakhtsen

  • Guest
  • Country: 00
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2009, 12:14:32 pm »
Quote from: Devo
This topic/question relates to leadership in the common era, specifically, the Nisut. I haven't been able to find much information on this, and I've heard conflicting answers as to why there is a Nisut, the necessity of a Nisut, and what role said Nisut plays in modern Kemetic practice.
So, in your opinion, how important is a Nisut in your Kemetic practices? And why?

And sorry if this has been asked before, I couldn't find anything on it.

-Devo


Em Hotep,

The Nisut is important to the Kemetic Universe because the ancients set it up that way. However, in my personal practices, the Nisut is something very far removed from me. I personally feel that if there was no coronated Nisut, the Gods would still find a way to be a part of my life. I didn't know about Nisuts at all, when They first did.

Our particular, current Nisut was more important to my practices when I served as a priest, but those were not my practices, they have a different purpose.

She now has some bearing in as much as certain aspects of my spiritual practice were taught to me by her (the  prayerbook covers some)  , but not all. She has also been a friend to me at times.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 pm by Maainakhtsen »
Senebty,
Ma'ai

"A great pleasure in life is doing what others say you can't." -A Fortune Cookie

Offline Tahai

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2009, 12:18:41 pm »
Em hotep, Devo.

Tamara Siuda is our Nisut because Sekhmet said (paraphrasing) IT IS TIME FOR A NISUT.  YOU WILL BE NISUT!   And after several years of saying NO, Tamara finally gave in and said YES.  After undergoing a corronation ritual based on Ancient practices, interpreted through modern mind, Tamara Siuda became Hekatawy, and Nisut of the KO 'nation.'  That's history.

Presently, as Kai Imakhu Sedjemes said, the Nisut is the connection between the Seen and Unseen.  She is our teacher, administrator, spiritual leader, and founder of the Kemetic Orthodox religion.  

With out a leader, groups have a tendency to fall apart.  Our Nisut is the glue that holds us together as a community.

Hope that helps.  Blessings and senebty,

Tahai
TahaiBast
Daughter of Bast.  Beloved of Sobek-Ra, Djehuty, and Sekhmet-Hethert.

Self-care Sekhmet and Sobek-Ra Keeper

Feed the Ka Association (FKA)

Offline kathleen

  • Remetj
  • Country: us
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2009, 05:15:33 pm »
Quote from: Maainakhtsen
I personally feel that if there was no coronated Nisut, the Gods would still find a way to be a part of my life. I didn't know about Nisuts at all, when They first did.


She now has some bearing in as much as certain aspects of my spiritual practice were taught to me by her... but not all.
Quote



this is how i feel as well.  my own practices tend to be of such an informal and spontaneous nature as to not be compatible with a lot of **ritual**, but i still have a great admiration for the practices of the KO faith, think them rather beautiful, and i greatly admire Rev. Siuda and all that she has created here.  She is not *necessary* to my relationship with Netjer by any means...but i believe what i learn from her helps to *enrich* it.  :)
Redheads are descended from cats. --Mark Twain

Offline Asetwedjbai

  • Divined Remetj
  • Country: ca
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2009, 05:31:43 pm »
Hotep, Devo

When I found the House of Netjer I was looking for a religious community that had a hierarchy. I had gone as far as I could alone (at the time), and was instructed by Isis (Who I was devoted to at the time) to go and learn about Her Kemetic form. Everything led me here, so I stayed :)

Kemetic Orthodoxy provides the framework for my spiritual practices, and Kemetic Orthodoxy was founded by Hemet. Hemet oversaw my conversion into Kemetic Orthodoxy (as She does for everyone by way of the RPD and Naming rituals) and my further vows to become a Shemsu-Ankh.

As a Kemetic practitioner, Hemet is a teacher, priest, god-mother, as well as a friend. Yes, I could be Kemetic without Her or Kemetic Orthodoxy but I choose not to.

Accepting the role of the Nisut was a bit of a transition to me; the whole idea was very foreign to me when I first came here.

Well, that was rather jumbled. Sorry :blush:

senebty, Wedjbai
Wedjbai
sat Aset
meryt Hethert, Wesir, Yinepu, Nut & Nebt-Het

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2009, 09:35:29 am »
Good bad or indifferent, most of these make her sound more like a priest than a Nisut. I guess I don't understand why she chose to be one over the other.
I'm glad to see that she seems to talk to people once they are a part of KO. I personally find it a bit disconcerting that she is the leader of a group, yet I have yet to see her anywhere here on the forums, or anywhere else. Not to mention the state of the websites and everything else. Which also was part of my confusion, in that a leader seems to be very absent from her people.

-Devo
dA | FB | Tumblr | WP

Offline Sekhmetnenek

  • Shemsu
  • Country: 00
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2009, 09:41:42 am »
Em hotep Devo!

I don't know your plans as far as the Kemetic Orthodoxy is concerned, but if you become a Beginner or higher, you have access to a special forum where you can ask the Nisut questions directly and she responds. I have found they are the best forums on here because she has a wealth of information and makes things easy to understand.

Having access to that forum has helped to dispel most concerns I had about the Nisut actually.

Just my two cents, hope it helps a little.
Senebty
Sekhmetnenek|Sekhmet Belongs to Me|
Sa Sekhmet-Hethert,
Mery Nebthet-Nit-Seshat

Offline NiankhSekhmet

  • Shemsu-Ankh
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2009, 09:42:49 am »
Hotep Devo

I saw your words "chose" to be Nisut and I had to giggle. That is a common misconception from many outside of Kemetic Orthodoxy.  It is my personal observation that no one but the biggest masochist or the most undeniably stupid person on the face of the planet would ever "choose" that position.  Believe me when I tell you, Hemet did NOT choose to be what she is over being a priest. It was what was asked of her. I was there - I saw it and I am not the only one by any stretch.  I can also tell you the level of dissassembling of her life that was done until Hemet agreed.

And as for not seeing her anywhere, well our Nisut (AUS) is a part of the Parliament of World Religions. She is a regular contributor in many places, not just here. And she most definitely is not absent from Her people.  We have access to her - probably more than many modern spiritual leaders. She has absolutely no problem interacting with and being available to the People within the Faith. Everyone from Beginner's on up have access to Her.

Those outside the Faith may contact her via the contacts list located at Kemet.org  OR write to her at nisut@kemet.org.  


Senebty!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 pm by NiankhSekhmet »
NiankhSekhmet
Sat Sekhmet-Mut/HetHert
Meryt-Amun (Beloved of Amun)
Heri Seshta Sekhmet-Mut / HetHert

Offline Sedjemes

  • Semer-Wati
  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2009, 09:48:23 am »
Hotep Devo.

These forums are actually only one part of the activities of our faith. Primarily the forums in which we are talking with the guests are the outer "courtyard" to to speak, where interested people can come and meet us, ask questions, engage in discussion.

But we also have forums for members, as well as other chats and live gatherings and spiritual events for members and invited friends and guests.

As Kai Imakhu Niankh indicated members can also have contact with the Nisut through various means.

What makes her more than a priest is that she created this faith. While she issues no commandments, all aspects of our state-directed faith practice and a few aspects of our personal faith practice are established specifically and completely by her.  We priests do not establish any such thing. Not here in Kemetic Orthodoxy at least. I cannot speak for priests anywhere outside of the House of Netjer.

Hope this helps more.

Senebty
Sedjemes
Khenmetaset ("Aset Gladdens")
Sedjemes ("She listens")
Daughter of Aset-Serqet, Meryt Ra her Sekhmet
Heri-Sesheta Aset-Serqet

Offline Sema'a

  • Rev. Danielle - Ordained Clergy
  • Country: us
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2009, 09:54:29 am »
Em hotep :)

I can only speak from personal experience here, so please note that I do not speak for every Shemsu or Remetj.

For me, the role of the Nisut is highly practical. The Nisut is an inspired spiritual teacher, who interacts with the gods in meaningful ways to coordinate and educate the community-- from Remetj to Kai-Imakhu. Our current Nisut, for example, has created the framework of a community of Kemetic worship that works, and works well, with rites of passage that provide Kemetic context we would otherwise be lacking in our modern lives.

While the presence of a Nisut does not directly influence my personal practices -- most of my personal practices are highly informal -- it is crucial to my adherence to the community of faith. The ritual of the Senut, weekly group worship, the annual retreat, and smaller weekend workshops are all made possible by a Nisut. My faith would feel incomplete without the existence of the community, which a Nisut helps to hold together. It's all well and good to worship the gods as I see fit, but having a community of worshippers has enriched my spirituality by more than a hundredfold.

Also, the Nisut is responsible for performing a number of rituals on behalf of the members of our community-- daily rituals to reinforce ma'at and so on. As our community grows I expect that this role will become more important, but also expand and change.

I hope that helps. Again, it's just my opinion of the role of any Nisut. :) YMMV, all that good stuff.

Senebty,
Sobeq

ETA: I see now that as I was replying there was a flurry of activity. Rather than write a whole long post, I'll just simply agree with Kai-Imakhiu Niankh and Sedjemes, and Vethorn. Our present Nisut (AUS) is heavily active within our community, going so far as to have regular weekly chats to teach, visiting regions of the United States, forum posts, open hours for discussion on instant messaging programs and on and on. :)
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 09:58:03 am by Sobeqsenu »
Priest of Wepwawet and Sekhmet-Mut
Beloved of Bast, Nut, Khonsu & Nebt-het
Heri-sesheta Wepwawet | Fedw Diviner
revdgallo@kemet.org

Offline Metitaitui

  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: 00
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2009, 09:58:09 am »
Quote from: Devo
Good bad or indifferent, most of these make her sound more like a priest than a Nisut. I guess I don't understand why she chose to be one over the other.
I'm glad to see that she seems to talk to people once they are a part of KO. I personally find it a bit disconcerting that she is the leader of a group, yet I have yet to see her anywhere here on the forums, or anywhere else. Not to mention the state of the websites and everything else. Which also was part of my confusion, in that a leader seems to be very absent from her people.

-Devo


She's not absent from us at all. There are the Ask the Nisut forums, the weekly chats, all the Tawy House events and gatherings like work studies and Wep Ronpet, she's involved with the beginner's class, and does the RPDs, she is reachable by phone, email, boards, and instant messaging. So nope, not absent at all :)
sat Set her Djehuty meryt Ra, Heru-wer, her Hethert

Offline Huyitu

  • Shemsu
Re: Leadership in the Common Era
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2009, 10:44:53 am »
I agree with Vethorn! Once I took the beginners class and read what the Nisut had to say it dispelled a lot of my worries about her. That and many members have a chance to interact with her via the chats or even on IM if they can find the time. Its unfortunate that the Nisut only interacts on her own forum, but she does so for a reason. I imagine if she tired to be on every section of our forums she wouldn’t have any time to do her other functions! That and many people, including myself, would probably be a little more uneasy about posting if they knew she chimed in regularly, I know that seems silly but I bet its true especially for beginners and guests.

Now when we talk about if the Nisut feels like a king to me or a high priestess its hard to differentiate. I do admit that she does feel like more of a high priestess, which is good, because that’s one of the major roles of the Nisut! Ancient Egypt was a monarchy and theocracy after all. Does she fee like a leader, yes, she does to me anyways. However, she does not wield secular power, that part of Nisut-hood will probably never be restored. Nor do I want, no matter how awesome the Nisut is, to have secular power in the way the Nisuts of old had, since I rather enjoy living in a republic. That and I doubt modern Egypt would be too keen on handing over the reigns of government to her no matter how fancy her hat is (and it is, if I can say so, very fancy) or how many hieroglyphs she can read or how many gods they don’t worship (with exceptions) anymore say they should.

Honestly though most of the institutions of old cannot be restored, nor, do I think people of the modern era would flourish under those institutions since we are not living a couple thousand years ago. Kemetic Orthodoxy doesn’t go out to restore those old institutions, it seeks to build something new based on historical evidence, modern living, ancient theology, and technology to create a new institution that’s heart is the same as the old: to serve the gods.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 pm by Huyitu »
Son of Wesir and Ra, Beloved of Wepwawet-Yinepu

 


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