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Author Topic: Ritual Texts  (Read 4287 times)

Ritual Texts
« on: March 08, 2012, 08:47:46 am »
Hotep, all. I hope this question belongs here, if not, please give me a gentle kick.

I am looking for primary source (or reliable secondary source; perhaps KO has already collected these?) descriptions for the format of rituals. I have operated primarily from intuition, and am looking to develop my practice to include ritual structure and content directly from the records of Egypt.

What books, passages, papyri, websites...etc.. would you all recommend? If it is pertinent, my affinities lie primarily with Aset and Wesir, Sekhmet, and Set.

Many thanks!
Alia
[font:Book Antiqua][color:#000080]When someone mentions the gracefulness
of the nightsky, climb up on the roof
and dance and say,

Like this.
[align:right]~Rumi[/color][/align][/font]

Offline Ankhetbast

  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2012, 08:55:03 am »
Within Kemetic Orthodoxy, our primary ritual is Senut.  It is taught as part of our beginners course.  Though not of ancient origin, I have found it to be both beautiful and profound.

Is there a specific ritual or ritual action which you are wondering about?  
~~~~Ankhetbast~~~~

Sat Bast her Hekatawy I (AUS), Meryt Serqet, Yinepu her HetHert

"Be excellent to each other." ~Bill and Ted

Offline Sedjemes

  • Semer-Wati
  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2012, 09:00:31 am »
Em hotep and welcome, Alia,

There is nothing wrong with intuition, particularly in reference to worshiping the gods :)

Records from ancient texts would primarily have to do with temple, state rituals, not personal household private devotions. There are some books that talk about how temple rituals were structured, from a scholarly, not religious-devotional standpoint. Some Kemetic folks outside Kemetic Orthodoxy have written books on how to adapt such rituals to personal practice.

The Kemetic Orthodox Senut, or shrine rite, referred to by Ankhetbast, one of our members, is also available to anyone who may want to incorporate it, in the _Ancient Egyptian Prayerbook_ written by our Nisut, Rev. Tamara Siuda (you can see what it looks like here:  http://www.amazon.com/Ancient-Egyptian-Prayerbook-Hardcover-Edition/dp/0557107180/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331218755&sr=8-1)

Please feel free to ask further questions.
Khenmetaset ("Aset Gladdens")
Sedjemes ("She listens")
Daughter of Aset-Serqet, Meryt Ra her Sekhmet
Heri-Sesheta Aset-Serqet

Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2012, 09:11:44 am »
As Ankhetbast says, Senut is the daily rite. It's also printed in the Ancient Egyptian Prayer Book by Tamara Siuda, so you could read it there if you don't want to wait for the next beginners class.

Another source of rituals, not particularly Kemetic Orthodox, is Richard Reidy's book Eternal Egypt. It starts out with several grand rituals that run to 20+ pages, but in part 2, starting at pg 187, there are simpler rituals you could do daily.
Kemetic Reconnaissance Blog
Shrine Beautiful Inspiring, Enchanting Sacred Spaces.
Kemetic Roundtable Kemetic bloggers giving their perspectives on beginner questions.

Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2012, 11:25:25 am »
Quote from: Alia
Hotep, all. I hope this question belongs here, if not, please give me a gentle kick.

I am looking for primary source (or reliable secondary source; perhaps KO has already collected these?) descriptions for the format of rituals. I have operated primarily from intuition, and am looking to develop my practice to include ritual structure and content directly from the records of Egypt.

What books, passages, papyri, websites...etc.. would you all recommend? If it is pertinent, my affinities lie primarily with Aset and Wesir, Sekhmet, and Set.

Many thanks!
Alia


Most, if not all, personal practices that were performed during ancient times were done either via intuition, which is a modern word for the divine speaking to you. :) The "state" rituals, as previously mentioned, were for the benefit of, well, the State :), the Land of Egypt, the Pharoah and her subjects. But, the everyday person was able to incorporate some of those into their daily practice. Let's not forget that even the simple lay person in ancient egypt had training, to some limited extent, in the temple and was called upon to perform rites in the temple; this usually worked on a 30 day rotation.

There's no need to buy a book to pray to your god. Intuition out-trumps the dollar any and everyday :)
Ankh Wedja Seneb

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2012, 11:43:22 am »
I second what Helms has suggested. Reidy's book is probably one of the better books out there for looking at how the ancients performed rituals. It's written in a way that it could easily be adapted to daily practice, which is also nice.

-Devo
dA | FB | Tumblr | WP

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2012, 11:44:36 am »
Quote from: MERITSEKHMET
But, the everyday person was able to incorporate some of those into their daily practice. Let's not forget that even the simple lay person in ancient egypt had training, to some limited extent, in the temple and was called upon to perform rites in the temple; this usually worked on a 30 day rotation.


Define lay person? Are you saying that you believe that every person in AE was undertaking some kind of training within the temple? Or am I misreading you?

-Devo
dA | FB | Tumblr | WP

Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2012, 11:55:01 am »
Quote from: Devo
Quote from: MERITSEKHMET
But, the everyday person was able to incorporate some of those into their daily practice. Let's not forget that even the simple lay person in ancient egypt had training, to some limited extent, in the temple and was called upon to perform rites in the temple; this usually worked on a 30 day rotation.


Define lay person? Are you saying that you believe that every person in AE was undertaking some kind of training within the temple? Or am I misreading you?

-Devo


You understood correctly what I said in reference to lay priests :) A lay priest "worked" partime in the temple and would hold another job often in a position in the state or local governments. The lay priests were especially common in small communities. In ancient Egypt, unlike today, people actually knew what their religion was about, knew the rituals and were serious about it.
Ankh Wedja Seneb

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2012, 11:59:14 am »
Quote from: MERITSEKHMET

You understood correctly what I said in reference to lay priests :) A lay priest "worked" partime in the temple and would hold another job often in a position in the state or local governments. The lay priests were especially common in small communities. In ancient Egypt, unlike today, people actually knew what their religion was about, knew the rituals and were serious about it.


I am glad you clarified, as you originally had said 'lay person', which would have an entirely different meaning.

I'm not sure that I'd agree that everyone knew what the religion was about in regards to ritual, as I feel that many of us have a romanticized view of the priesthood in AE, but I think that is neither here nor there.

Thank you for the clarification.

-Devo
dA | FB | Tumblr | WP

Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2012, 01:44:28 pm »
Quote from: Devo
Quote from: MERITSEKHMET

You understood correctly what I said in reference to lay priests :) A lay priest "worked" partime in the temple and would hold another job often in a position in the state or local governments. The lay priests were especially common in small communities. In ancient Egypt, unlike today, people actually knew what their religion was about, knew the rituals and were serious about it.


I am glad you clarified, as you originally had said 'lay person', which would have an entirely different meaning.

I'm not sure that I'd agree that everyone knew what the religion was about in regards to ritual, as I feel that many of us have a romanticized view of the priesthood in AE, but I think that is neither here nor there.

Thank you for the clarification.

-Devo


yep yep...
Ankh Wedja Seneb

Offline Niheri

  • Shemsu
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2012, 02:05:24 pm »
Em hotep.

I may be wrong, but I think that quite a lot of the priests in Ancient Egypt served the Temples for some of the time, (when their land was unworkable because of the inundation, perhaps?), but were also members of their communities, outside of the Temples. When they were at home, they may have been able to help their families with many things that they had learned. Not many people could write, and taxes were something everyone had to know about. People who had served in a Temple may have had basic instruction with tallying and writing that would benefit the community. This is conjecture, but, being a "part-time" priest doesn't sound too bad to me, if you share your knowledge where it is needed.

Senebty,
Ni.
Daughter of Wepwawet-Yinepu

Beloved of Set and Amun-Ra.

Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2012, 02:50:14 pm »
Quote from: Niheri
Em hotep.

I may be wrong, but I think that quite a lot of the priests in Ancient Egypt served the Temples for some of the time, (when their land was unworkable because of the inundation, perhaps?), but were also members of their communities, outside of the Temples. When they were at home, they may have been able to help their families with many things that they had learned. Not many people could write, and taxes were something everyone had to know about. People who had served in a Temple may have had basic instruction with tallying and writing that would benefit the community. This is conjecture, but, being a "part-time" priest doesn't sound too bad to me, if you share your knowledge where it is needed.

Senebty,
Ni.



To put it very simply - you had your "mains" who were always there which was their life from a very early age and then you had your "temps." Lay priest, common people who had some training that came in to "lend a hand" during different times of the year. They spent a month doing this and then went about their normal lives until called up again for duty. This was a form of national devotion to allow everyone a chance to serve in the temples.
Ankh Wedja Seneb

Offline Devo

  • Remetj
Re: Ritual Texts
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2012, 03:52:01 pm »
I think it's also important to note that temples and priesthood was a lot bigger than just servicing the idol/statue of the god of the temple. There was land that needed to be worked, animals to be fed, linens to be woven... etc etc. I think we have a much narrower concept of what a 'priest' is now a days. I think proof of this can be seen by the volume of threads that have discussed this on KIN and TC.

-Devo
dA | FB | Tumblr | WP

 


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