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Author Topic: Not eating my offerings?  (Read 5141 times)

Offline Minpin

  • Country: 00
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2017, 01:16:38 pm »
Of course, please ask and discuss further. I find the replies very interesting, thanks everyone.
Hail Anubis!

Offline Shuwyt

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2017, 04:04:45 pm »
All of that being said - One thing I don't see addressed often is while food can seem like a normal, easy offering for people who enjoy food and don't have issues with it (or have minimal issues with it), it's not as great for people for whom that's not the case. To use the cake example, it's like being at a party where there's cake, not having a problem with other people enjoying the cake, but then having the cake pushed on you and being treated like there's something wrong with you, or you're bringing the party down, because you don't want any yourself. If you have a very obvious medical reason for not being able to do cake, something on the level of diabetes or an allergy, maybe you'll get a pass. But if you just don't LIKE cake, or you're on a diet, or you have a problem that people aren't as aware of or don't understand (and are therefore less willing to accept as valid), you get the, "Well, can't you just have a little? You're hurting the feelings of the birthday kid/person who brought the cake/people who feel sorry for you missing out."

So a thing where offering and sharing food isn't just an option, but kind of a basic expectation, can be really, REALLY awkward when eating is a chore at best and a miserable struggle at worst. It's one thing when you can work around it by thinking, "If (this) isn't an appropriate offering for me, I can offer (that) instead," but if all you're thinking is, "I hate this, I resent the entire concept of needing to eat to survive, and I just want it to be over with as quickly as possible..." Generally, that's something people wouldn't see as a good place to approach the Gods from, you know?

(My workaround for that is I offer food in shrine/as something special very, very rarely, and if I feel I do need to, I tend to do the "Small/symbolic offering, that can be put outside/given to a pet/whatever as long as it's just not going into the trashcan" thing. I will offer what I'm already eating, without taking it into shrine, but by the time you factor in not just the, "Ugh, food, why?" aspect, but all the OCD crap I have to go through both before and after saying grace on top of it, it's still not something that there's much joy or gratitude in.)
Shuwytyinepu (Yinepu's Shadow)
Sat Yinepu-Wepwawet, meryt Sokar-Wesir her Ra
Curiosity killed the - ooh! What's that?

Offline TahekerutAset

  • Shemsu
  • Country: 00
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2017, 08:04:02 pm »
I asked Aset this once. I wrote this poem afterwards.  I don't know if  this helps or not, but
 it helped me understand eating offerings. 

(This is published in my book Queen of the Road: Poetry of the Goddess Aset.)

Ritual is comprised of three parts:
Offerings of fragrance, flame and food
An exchange of Ka-Power
between deity and devotee
A renewal of the cosmos
Offering fragrance is offering the breath of the First Time
Offering flame is the First Light, Ra's First Dawn Offering water is the First Waters with the potential of creation
Offering food and drink are
the ways in which the Seen and Unseen Worlds exchange Power
This is what is used to make the exchange of Ka-Power
from devotee to deity
from deity to devotee
Why do you think you eat Our offerings?
What makes you discard Our Power so easily?
Why do you not eat the offerings you give Us? Why do you not offer the food you eat?
Even if your diet is restricted
You still eat
So offer what you eat
And Our Ka-Power will flow
between deity and devotee
between devotee and deity
even if you cannot do ritual
Our Ka-Power will flow
Eat the foods of the Gods below
 
TahekerutAset "Aset's Jewel"
Sat Aset
Meryt Nebet Het, Wepwawet, Sekhmet-Mut, Ra, Mut,  Bast-Mut, Shu, Tefnut

Website:  Fiercely Bright One

Offline Gleb

  • Remetj
  • Country: 00
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2017, 07:20:38 am »
I asked Aset this once. I wrote this poem afterwards.  I don't know if  this helps or not, but
 it helped me understand eating offerings. 

(This is published in my book Queen of the Road: Poetry of the Goddess Aset.)

Ritual is comprised of three parts:
Offerings of fragrance, flame and food
An exchange of Ka-Power
between deity and devotee
A renewal of the cosmos
Offering fragrance is offering the breath of the First Time
Offering flame is the First Light, Ra's First Dawn Offering water is the First Waters with the potential of creation
Offering food and drink are
the ways in which the Seen and Unseen Worlds exchange Power
This is what is used to make the exchange of Ka-Power
from devotee to deity
from deity to devotee
Why do you think you eat Our offerings?
What makes you discard Our Power so easily?
Why do you not eat the offerings you give Us? Why do you not offer the food you eat?
Even if your diet is restricted
You still eat
So offer what you eat
And Our Ka-Power will flow
between deity and devotee
between devotee and deity
even if you cannot do ritual
Our Ka-Power will flow
Eat the foods of the Gods below
 


Thanks for writing this, it clears things up a bit. :)
Senebty,
Gleb

Offline Sedjfaiemitui

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2017, 08:17:07 am »
*Double-posted for some reason.*
« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 08:36:44 am by Sedjfaiemitui »
"Endowed by Two Fathers"
𓁣 𓁠
Sat Set her Amun-Re-Banebdjedet
Meryt Herishef, Wesir-Narefy, Heru-Wer, her Yinepu

Offline Sedjfaiemitui

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2017, 08:25:05 am »
Em hotep nefer, Minpin! :)


As a general rule in Egyptian religion(s), namely their Modern Revivals and most specifically our Kemetic Orthodoxy here, funerary food offerings are not eaten by living people, but Divine food offerings are to be reverted and eaten, since the food is spiritually imbued with the Divine life-giving heka of the Netjeru in the ritual act of offering it to Them. Throwing away food offered to the Gods is generally, but not necessarily universally, frowned upon in Egyptian religion(s). That is also typically the rule for most other Afro-Asiatic religions, though for example Mesopotamian religions have a habit of sharing food with ancestors, not just the Gods, never simply committing those life-energies embodied by food to the dead and refraining from touching that food afterward.

I think it safe to say that the vast majority of self-described and formally initiated Kemetic Orthodox here revert and consume their food offerings made to the Netjeru. That is to say, that is the official stance of our Temple, on what people who consider themselves Kemetic Orthodox ought to do with Divine food offerings.

I hope this helps!

Senebty,
Sedjfai

If the OP consents, I'd like to ask for further explanation. I've had this question for a while now and haven't really understood how the spiritual part of the offerings goes to the Neteru. And I feel a bit unsure of consuming the physical part of the offerings. I know it's the practice here but it doesn't make me feel better about it.

Em hotep nefer, Gleb! :)

The spiritual essence / nourishment of the food is transferred to the Netjeru through the heka of offering, through the heka of ritual. It's not a process that can be described in clinical, empirical terms, so the kind of explanation you might be looking for is not the kind that can be provided in such matters.

The Netjeru, being Pure (Divine) Souls not confined to bodies as we mortal beings are, don't and can't physically eat the food. We have to do that. We require physical nourishment. The Netjeru provide the spiritual nourishment in an equal exchange whenever we provide Them with offerings. Leaving things to rot creates a physical dirtiness which in turn creates a spiritual dirtiness in the shrine-space. When you don't revert / share the meal with the Netjeru once Senut is concluded, an imbalance is created, however small.

Something that is perhaps hard for Modern people to grasp: in Afro-Asiatic religions across the board, from Ancient Southern Iran to Ancient Libya and beyond, there are no truly "inanimate objects." Everything has, for lack of better terms, "spirit" and "energy." Moreover, specific food items, like dates and grapes, carry many layers of symbolic and ritual meaning. And, in sharing these meaningful things with the Netjeru, we are sustaining a mutual relationship, and we are re-enacting Divine events in Divine time which help to maintain Cosmic Order by offering certain things during certain festivals and so on. The Netjeru do not simply take, and we do not simply give; similarly, we do not simply take from Them, and They do not simply give. Shared food, shared meals, are among the most basic and universal symbolic acts of unity, of symbiotic relationships in their most correct state.

This is why reversion matters. This is why it's mandated.

I understand that it's not the norm in the Modern cultures we come from, and that it's not the easiest concept to wrap our Modern brains around. But, for better or worse, it's not particularly about what we are comfortable with. This is chiefly about the Gods and our maintaining good relationships with the Gods. A person has plenty of wiggle-room concerning what to offer and when. It can be as basic as bread and water. It can be as fun and decadent as offering sweet cakes. It doesn't categorically have to be something you don't like and/or can't eat. As Taji said above, our religion isn't about deprivation and suffering. You're only as limited as you make yourself feel. ;)

I hope this helps!

Senebty,
Sedjfai
« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 08:31:22 am by Sedjfaiemitui »
"Endowed by Two Fathers"
𓁣 𓁠
Sat Set her Amun-Re-Banebdjedet
Meryt Herishef, Wesir-Narefy, Heru-Wer, her Yinepu

Offline Gleb

  • Remetj
  • Country: 00
Re: Not eating my offerings?
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2017, 02:29:35 am »
Thanks :) It's a lot clearer now.
Senebty,
Gleb

 


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