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Author Topic: Greetings  (Read 258 times)

Offline Inzoreno

  • Country: us
Greetings
« on: April 11, 2018, 07:07:41 pm »
Greetings everyone,

I am Ron and I first came across the House some years ago and spent a short amount of time hear, reading through the various threads on here, leaning what it was all about. It never ended up coming to anything, and in the years sense I became a strong atheist. However, with that said, there's always been something in the back of my mind that's been drawing me here. I've stepped in off an on, reading through various threads on here. As such, I feel a great conflict and thought I would seek some wisdom here. On one hand, there's something that just feel 'right' here. Maybe it's just my fascination with Ancient Egypt in general, or something more, I do not know. But on the other hand, there's a part that tells me to move on, this isn't where I should be. Has anyone ever experienced such a state themselves? Thank you in advance for whatever wisdom and advice you can share.

Offline Awibemhethert

  • W'ab Priest (Lay Clergy) - Web Assistant
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Country: 00
Re: Greetings
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2018, 07:30:51 pm »
Em hotep, Ron.

I have experienced something like what you're talking about. Not particularly with the House of Netjer, but with other religious organizations I was a member of at one time.

I won't go into details about the whole thing, but only say I belonged to the other group because my "logical mind" told me it was what made sense, even though my heart wasn't in it.

Eventually I decided I really needed to go where my heart was, not where my logic said I should be. And as a result I am having the first really positive relationship with any kind of deity ever.

My decision to be in the House of Netjer is now based on both intuition, heart, and logic.

I was at a chat yesterday evening and someone brought up the statement that Netjer and the Netjeru don't need us to believe in them. They exist. They know they exist. They don't need us to "make them real" by believing they exist. Somehow this makes me much more comfortable with the times that I doubt things. It doesn't happen often now, but there was a time I really felt "in the dark." Now, I'm just comfortable.

I hope this is of some use to you.

If you'd like to talk more, just let me know.

Senebty,

Ibi
Awibemhethert
Sat Hethert-Sekhmet
meryt Wesir

Self-Care Hethert Keeper

Offline Inzoreno

  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2018, 07:48:45 pm »
That is indeed some helpful advice.

I grew up in a religious Christian household, but once my father passed away in 2000, it became harder to reconcile the idea of their being some loving deity with the real struggles my family faced after that and towards my late teens, I became disgusted by some of the hateful language against people of other faiths or homosexuals that I completely dropped out. Once I accepted the label of atheist, I have grown extremely wary of organized religion in general.

In addition, I earned a degree in biology and the years spent learning about the natural world have reinforced an evidence-based worldview. It's very, very hard to for me to turn off that voice that tells me none of this is real.

And yet, despite it all, I am still drawn to here. I don't know why.

Offline Khamheru

  • Shemsu
  • Country: br
Re: Greetings
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2018, 07:33:08 am »
Em hotep. 

If you *think* of our gods, you are right, in some way they are not real. In the level of the mind and thinking, maybe religion will not satisfy you because this is much more about the heart and faith rather than mind and proof. You will not see the gods looming from the dark or waving at you from the other side of the street, but you might perceive - in a level that's not logic or physical - that they are there. This is just my point of view of things. Have a good day!

Online Djehutyendy

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2018, 08:36:29 am »
Em hotep, Ron!

In addition, I earned a degree in biology and the years spent learning about the natural world have reinforced an evidence-based worldview. It's very, very hard to for me to turn off that voice that tells me none of this is real.

I have degrees in chemistry and geochemistry, so I can understand where you are coming from here. It is important to remember that it isn't science versus religion, but rather science and religion. The two can very easily co-exist. In fact, I found that the more I learn about science and the intricacies of the world, the closer I feel to the gods. There is a certain beauty and grace in how the natural world functions, and I feel that this is the very essence of Netjer.

But at the end of the day, you need to follow your heart and your gut. I hope you can figure out what that is, whether it be with the House of Netjer or not :)

Senebty,
Endy
Djehutyendy -- Djehuty is here

Daughter of Djehuty and Beloved of Hethert-Sekhmet and Geb

Offline Sobeqsenu

  • Rev. Sobeq - Ordained Clergy
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2018, 08:58:02 am »
In addition, I earned a degree in biology and the years spent learning about the natural world have reinforced an evidence-based worldview. It's very, very hard to for me to turn off that voice that tells me none of this is real.

Wow, do I ever identify with that sentence or what! I also work in an evidenced-based field, and it feels so strange to rely on my heart and internal experiences. I'm always doubting and testing and asking questions. At the end of the day, I continue to believe in the gods and practice Kemetic Orthodoxy because I want to. Maybe that is the nature of faith. Whatever it is, you certainly aren't the only one.
Rev. Sobeqsenu
Priest of Wepwawet & Sekhmet-Mut
Beloved of Bast, Nut, Khonsu, & Nebt-het
W'ab Nekhen Ib Imau-sen | Heri-sesheta Wepwawet

Offline Inzoreno

  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2018, 06:41:45 pm »
I appreciate the responses so far, it's certainly given me plenty to ponder over.  Thank you!

Offline Tjemsy

  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2018, 07:55:42 pm »
I grew up in a religious Christian household, but once my father passed away in 2000, it became harder to reconcile the idea of their being some loving deity with the real struggles my family faced after that and towards my late teens, I became disgusted by some of the hateful language against people of other faiths or homosexuals that I completely dropped out. Once I accepted the label of atheist, I have grown extremely wary of organized religion in general.

Em hotep and welcome! I have some thoughts. <3

This is exactly the issue I had/have with Christianity. I could not believe in a "perfect" God who allowed terrible things to happen to innocent people. And of the commandments, "Thou shalt honor thy father and mother" felt pretty awful to me, being that my parents were/are abusive.

I also did not like the idea of a God who demanded worship and subservience, because when a person does that we call it an abuse of power. To me, it is not acceptable that a God do this, either.

The way I reconcile this is by believing that Gods are -not- perfect. I do believe they make mistakes; if you look at our myths, you can see quite a bit of that.

I do not believe that they are all-powerful in the sense that everything that ever happens is under their control. I believe there are a great deal of Gods who influence things in their own way, but they are either unable to remove all the bad things from the world (that's an awful lot, even for a God), or unwilling to. Because struggle can bring growth.

On that note, my father Set is rather known for metaphorically burning your house down so you can build a better one. And because I believe that Gods are as complex as we are, I do not believe that having the ability to shake things up in such a way makes them evil. I reject the notion of "pure evil" satan-like figures.
Tjemsy - "Two Red Ones"

Sat Sekhmet her Set
Meryt Heru-wer, Bast, Wepwawet, Taweret, Nebthet,
 & Nefertem-Imhotep

Offline Awibemhethert

  • W'ab Priest (Lay Clergy) - Web Assistant
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Country: 00
Re: Greetings
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2018, 09:57:06 am »
Ah, Tjemsy! Yes!

Probably my biggest problem with Christianity has always been the omnipotent thing. The "anything that happens to you is God's will." The "great plan" that I'm too small to understand that requires people to need to have horrendous experiences. I could never accept that. And, love aside, I wouldn't respect a person who did things like that. Why should I respect a God who does?

Having gods who aren't omnipotent or omnipresent, gods that can make mistakes... helps me. (Perhaps that's strange logic.) Yes, if the gods don't control everything it means there's a lot of unknown in my life, and for many that's just too frightening. It just works better for me.

Also, knowing that the Middle Egyptian word for perfect ("nefer") is also the same word used for zero helps. Hemet explained to me that it means that for that culture, perfection was an ideal and didn't really "exist." As a recovering perfectionist, knowing that it's not "expected" of me  means so much.

Anyway... thanks for sharing that Tjemsy.

Ibi
Awibemhethert
Sat Hethert-Sekhmet
meryt Wesir

Self-Care Hethert Keeper

Offline Darytessekhmet

  • Rev. Daryt - Ordained Clergy - Moderator (Prayer Requests Forums)
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2018, 04:47:50 pm »
Welcome Ron!  I hope you enjoy your time here and learn things that help you along the way.
Daughter of Sekhmet and Nisut Hekatawy(AUS)
W'abet Nekhen sehotep.tu ib-es yim-ef, The Shrine in Which Her Heart is Appeased

Her Father controls Sekhmet, Sekhmet subdues evil, Sekhmet controls Her temper
Even small rivers keep the lands green and the oceans wet.

Offline Capra

  • Country: ca
Re: Greetings
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2018, 08:49:21 pm »
Em hotep, fellow newcomer.  :)

Offline Ra'awyserqet

  • Shemsu-Ankh
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2018, 11:28:23 am »
Em hotep and welcome Ron!

For me, when I was officially branching out into "not-Christian" areas, I was first poking at Wicca before I quickly went nope. After that it was chaos magic (Phil Hine style) for many a year.

The thing I think of when I doubt Them is the moto or mantra of chaos magic: "Nothing is true, everything is permitted." Because nothing is true, it's perfectly alright for me to believe in the Netjeru and in what I believe and do. If it works for me, it works and I'm okay just accepting that and going along my merry way. It doesn't really matter if They are really real or just figments of my imagination (though I've had enough "evidence" to disprove that theory), so long as believing in Them and doing as I do has a positive impact on my life.

So I don't worry too much about trying to rationally prove Their existence, but my way isn't everyone's way obviously. :)

Welcome to the House and enjoy your stay, however long it may be.

Senebty
Ra'awy
(They/them)

Sat Serqet-Aset her Nisut-bity Hekatawy | (aus), meryt Sekhmet-Mut, Yinepu-Wepwawet, Heru-wer, her Hethert-Nut-as-Nehmet-Awai.

Fedw Diviner

Offline Yinepuemsaes

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2018, 07:40:44 pm »
Em hotep, it's very nice to meet you!
Yinepuemsaes - "Yinepu is her protection"
Sat Yinepu
Meryt Bast

Offline Tatuayinepu

  • Shemsu
  • Country: us
Re: Greetings
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2018, 02:18:24 pm »
Em hotep and welcome.

It has been said that belief is not required, that the Netjer exist whether we believe they do or not. Along these lines it has also been said that belief is a crutch from scriptural religions (like Christianity), and Kemetic religion is not scriptural. While we do have texts of religious nature in KO they are not used in the manner that the bible is. Belief is not demanded of anyone here.

That last sentence is actually a comfort to me, having been witness to and victim of patriarchal religion that demands belief, "or else", with the latter usually being something hot and horrible. I naturally rebel against such things. I also rebel against anything or anyone that has to demand and compel, I will not submit to that...and from an allegedly loving god? Give me a break. One that demands that women "submit to their husbands"???? No. Just no.

The Egyptian Netjer did not demand anything of me when I first encountered Yinepu 36 years ago, when I died and came back. I went on my way until I started having dreams of Him in 2010/11. He has been a part of my life ever since. Not once has He, or any of the Netjer, ever demanded anything, threatened me with eternal damnation, or told me I was less than because of my gender, neighborhood, beliefs, or opinions. To the contrary. I am welcome. I am loved...for who I am...for all I am.

All I was, and all I am, is open. I tell Netjer that I am here, and I am listening. Sometimes I hear quiet. Sometimes I hear words. Sometimes it is impressions that I sense. Still other times it is a shift in the wind or the whispers of the woods.

I have seen much in the way of direct evidence through the years with Yinepu to suggest that even in my cynical, "show me" brain, there are things that are not explained in any other manner than...Divine.

 I think our culture and socialization leans so much to materialism, and there's so much emphasis on the separation of science, religion, magic, and medicine that it makes life difficult for many of us. For the Ancient Egyptians, there was no such separation, and there was not even a distinct word for "magic" until the later influx of the Greeks (historians in the House of Netjer may correct me if I'm not right about the latter statement).

That said, I have also been schooled formally in science, the need for evidence, and the value of scholarship.  But I feel equally sure that there is a validity to evidence that does not neatly fall into the realm of the five senses or the reproducibility of the scientific method.  For me, I have seen many times that if we rely on strictly the five senses and what is directly in front of us, we will miss the beauty of the trees, the whispers of the winds, the warmth of the sun and the light kiss of the early morning mist. We miss that small, hushed, still voice. If we demand studies to "prove" this elusive set of factors, it will elude us. If we dismiss the unseen because we can not discern it when we apply a particular method or methods, it is entirely possible that our methods are either incorrect for this application, or our understanding is limited.

The latter has been a major underlying lesson for me over the years. I have found more freedom if I am able to see that my understanding, while capable of growing, is limited while I am incarnate as a human. 

I digress. This is just my experience. The nice thing is that we can all have our own experiences, and all are welcome. Nothing is demanded of us. We can all just be, whether that is cynical, open, closed, mystical, or a mixture of many things.

Thank you for reading.

Tatuayinepu
 
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 02:36:15 pm by Tatuayinepu »
Tatuayinepu "The one Yinepu sustains"

Daughter of Yinepu-Wepwawet, Beloved of Sekhmet-Hethert, Beloved of Heru Sa Aset

Sau Apprentice

 


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